sissydudeomen2:

FRANK BERLIN

GABE LADUKE by FRANK BERLIN

sixpenceee:

fluxmachine:

itscolossal:

Artist Kevin Weir Creates Ghostly Animated GIFs Using Archival Photos from the Library of Congress [Sponsor]

I was featured on colossal today, very exciting.

Woah this is amazing. 

The Alnwick Poison Garden is pretty much what you’d think it is: a garden full of plants that can kill you (among many other things). Some of the plants are so dangerous that they have to be kept behind bars. [x]

Lovely.

Jessica Lange in American Horror Story trailers

whiteboykik:

I WAS JUST READING A TINDER REVIEW AND WHAT THE FUCK

Well I did not see that coming.

whiteboykik:

I WAS JUST READING A TINDER REVIEW AND WHAT THE FUCK

Well I did not see that coming.

aseaofquotes:

Aidan Chambers, This is All

aseaofquotes:

Aidan Chambers, This is All

mikerugnetta:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Pawel Fabjanski

Afterimages

"Untitled" series prepared for "Powidoki | Afterimages" album released by Polish National Film School

good morning. i am in love with every single one of the above photos. 

those lamps, tho!

[Algorithms and heuristics] are very important in cybernetics, for in dealing with unthinkable systems it is normally impossible to give a full specification of a goal, and therefore impossible to prescribe an algorithm. But it is not usually too difficult to prescribe a class of goals, so that moving in some general description will leave you better off (by some definite criterion) than you were before. To think in terms of heuristics rather than algorithms is at once a way of coping with proliferating variety. Instead of trying to organize it in full detail, you organize it only somewhat; you then ride on the dynamics of the system in the direction you want to go.

These two techniques for organizing control in a system of proliferating variety are really rather dissimilar. The strange thing is that we tend to live our lives by heuristics, and to try and control them by algorithms. Our general endeavor is to survive, yet we specify in detail (‘catch the 8:45 train’, ‘ask for a raise’) how to get to this unspecified and unspecifiable goal. We certainly need these algorithms, in order to live coherently; but we also need heuristics — and we are rarely conscious of them. This is because our education is planned around detailed analysis: we do not (we learn) really understand things unless we can specify their infrastructure. The point came up before in the discussion of transfer functions, and now it comes up again in connection with goals. […] Birds evolved from reptiles, it seems. Did a representative body of lizards pass a resolution to learn to fly? If so, by what means could the lizards have organized their genetic variety to grow wings? One has only to say such things to recognize them as ridiculous — but the birds are flying this evening outside my window. This is because heuristics work while we are still sucking the pencil which would like to prescribe an algorithm.

Stafford Beer, “Brain of the Firm,” 1972. 

1972, folks. “This is because heuristics work while we are still sucking the pencil which would like to prescribe an algorithm.”

(via slavin)

The End of Gamers

dangolding:

On the evidence of the last few weeks, what we are seeing is the end of gamers, and the viciousness that accompanies the death of an identity. Due to fundamental shifts in the videogame audience, and a move towards progressive attitudes within more traditional areas of videogame culture, the gamer identity has been broken. It has nowhere to call home, and so it reaches out inarticulately at invented problems, such as bias and corruption, which are partly just ways of expressing confusion as to why things the traditional gamer does not understand are successful (that such confusion results in abject heartlessness is an indictment on the character of the male-focussed gamer culture to begin with).

Let’s start by noting the internet economics of all media is much the same. Music, movies, TV, newspapers, magazines and books all have a very high creative and human fixed cost to produce. But once created have essentially zero cost to replicate and distribute. So we should expect all types of media to wind up with roughly comparable internet distribution models.

Internet economics is relentlessly pulling ebooks and libraries towards subscription streaming

And as goes video, so goes text. As Nathan notes here, I think it’s a little easier to see which parts of the book industry will resist commodification, at least in the near term. Partially because the industry has been here before, with the rise of the paperback.

And to my point about new forms of storytelling, the industry could do a lot worse than graphic novels and interactive children’s books.