I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence, or insanity to anyone, but they’ve always worked for me.
Hunter S. Thompson (via stxxz)

"Inventing is messy..."

parislemon:

Jeff Bezos in his annual shareholder letter:

Failure comes part and parcel with invention. It’s not optional. We understand that and believe in failing early and iterating until we get it right. When this process works, it means our failures are relatively small in size (most experiments can start small), and when we hit on something that is really working for customers, we double-down on it with hopes to turn it into an even bigger success. However, it’s not always as clean as that. Inventing is messy, and over time, it’s certain that we’ll fail at some big bets too.

Always a good read.

Regram from @silvie9000. Been meaning to talk to Franklin about this.

Regram from @silvie9000. Been meaning to talk to Franklin about this.

Lol

Lol

2,000 posts!

Of course I’m going to post this.

2,000 posts!

Of course I’m going to post this.

“Beliefs” and “views” deserve no inherent protection, validity, or value to the rest of society simply because they’re political or religious. They’re just opinions, and just as many opinions are worth considering and discussing, many others are offensive, crazy, ignorant, or bigoted.

“Political Views” – Marco.org

I’m really tired of arguing with straight white men on the internet about Brendan Eich. Marco did a great job of succinctly summarizing why this isn’t about free speech (cough, you privileged assholes, cough), so I’m just going to link to this.

suluboo:

relationship tip #78: ‘babe’ and ‘baby’ are cliche and outdated. try a fun new nickname such as ‘lieutenant’ instead 

What a ridiculous state of affairs this is. To obsess over the offline and deny all the ways we routinely remain disconnected is to fetishize this disconnection. Author after author pretends to be a lone voice, taking a courageous stand in support of the offline in precisely the moment it has proliferated and become over-valorized. For many, maintaining the fiction of the collective loss of the offline for everyone else is merely an attempt to construct their own personal time-outs as more special, as allowing them to rise above those social forces of distraction that have ensnared the masses. “I am real. I am the thoughtful human. You are the automaton.” I am reminded of a line from a recent essay by Sarah Nicole Prickett: that we are “so obsessed with the real that it’s unrealistic, atavistic, and just silly.” How have we come to make the error of collectively mourning the loss of that which is proliferating?

In great part, the reason is that we have been taught to mistakenly view online as meaning not offline. The notion of the offline as real and authentic is a recent invention, corresponding with the rise of the online. If we can fix this false separation and view the digital and physical as enmeshed, we will understand that what we do while connected is inseparable from what we do when disconnected. That is, disconnection from the smartphone and social media isn’t really disconnection at all: The logic of social media follows us long after we log out. There was and is no offline; it is a lusted-after fetish object that some claim special ability to attain, and it has always been a phantom.

Great essay by Nathan Jurgenson in The New Inquiry on The IRL Fetish. I’m a staunch believer in this unified vision of authenticity, and it’s an especially interesting point to keep in mind in regards to yesterday’s announcement that Facebook is acquiring Occulus. If you consider that a generation or two from now it will be widely accepted that our online social connections are as emotionally and intellectually valid as our offline social connections, it makes perfect sense that we will require more intimate ways to connect with them.